195mm crankset – Wow!!!

Posted by SuperClydesdale on July 9, 2010 under Commentary, Cranksets | 36 Comments to Read

My 195mm cransket came in from High Sierra Cycle Center.  Tom Slocum, who owns the place, was very patient with my myriad of questions — I highly recommend these guys.

The cranks are beautiful, and its now apparent just how long they are compared to the 180mm ones.  The funny thing is, 180mm are much longer than most people’s cranks — even 95% of the big & tall people who read this web site, and yet these 195mm make them look tiny.

They are beefy too.   A bit heavy, but Tom says they’ve never had one break.  With all the extra leverage the longer crank arms provide, and with the weight and power of a Clydesdale, its probably a safe play to have them a bit over-engineered.

So…. the important part.  I’ve done three rides with the new cranks.  All I can say is, “wow!”   After sending back the other crankset (I had an adjustable crankset to try multiple lengths of crank arm), I’d been riding my Rocky Mountain that has a 177.5mm crankset.  The 195s seem to be a good length for my 36″ true inseam because  I was expecting it to feel odd at first coming off of the 177.5′s.  But, as soon as I put the 195s on the new S-Works (more on why its new later) frame and started pedaling, it felt entirely normal.  Just better.  Much better.

With three rides and 100 miles, I feel I’m ready to make an initial report.  One ride that I do regularly (16 times since March) is 34 miles with pretty significant climbing (3,200 feet).    My average time is Cialis 2:13:08.  The fastest I had ever done the loop was 2:08.

This Thursday, I did the ride, and was fighting a tough headwind for part of it.  Despite that, I completed the loop in 2:00:32 — eight minutes faster than my faster-ever to date.  I was blown away.   8 minutes on a 2 hour ride is 6.5%! faster than my fastest-ever ride.  If you compare that to my average of 2:13, it’s 11% faster than my average over the last 15 rides.  You just cannot argue with that.

I didn’t make the change to make it easier — if I just wanted to make life easier, I’d be fat dumb and happy with my triple crankset.   I’m fat and happy, now I feel like I’m just not as dumb — dumb enough to be using baby cranks.  Let the little guys use the baby cranks.

I made the change to allow me to use bigger gears than I have been able to do.   And… it works!

At 6’3″, I am taller than average, but I know that there are many people who read this site that are taller than me.   In reading some of the initial data on my survey (by the way, if you haven’t taken the survey, please take it now), there’s only one other guy even riding 180mm cranks, and most everyone else has 175mm or 177.5mm, which I think is now proven to be absurd.

So, guys (I think I’m pretty safe to assume that my readers are guys), if you are tall and don’t switch to a proportionally correct crankset, then you’re missing out.

  • Targo said,

    Interesting. I’m 6′ 9″ and have been riding 175mm since I was racing 25 years ago. Now out of mothballs, I’m back in regular training.

    I won’t be trying extra long cranks any time soon as my custom frames are designed with my position in mind and if I went to 200mm arms I’d have to lower my seat 25 mm and that would destroy my position as I don’t have that available space to lower my stem.

    My coach [well over 6' 6"] warns about hip flexor issued switching to longer arms if your body is use to high mileage with shorter ones.

    Glad they’re rocking for you though!

  • Targo said,

    Interesting. I’m 6′ 9″ and have been riding 175mm since I was racing 25 years ago. Now out of mothballs, I’m back in regular training.

    I won’t be trying extra long cranks any time soon as my custom frames are designed with my position in mind and if I went to 200mm arms I’d have to lower my seat 25 mm and that would destroy my position as I don’t have that available space to lower my stem.

    My coach [well over 6' 6"] warns about hip flexor issued switching to longer arms if your body is use to high mileage with shorter ones.

    Glad they’re rocking for you though!

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Thanks for the comments.

    While I agree that longer cranks are not going to be universally applicable, I think that — for unknown reasons, perhaps fear of the unknown (for them) — there are a lot of detractors. However, remember that longer cranks are simply proportionally correct. A tall person like yourself using 195mm cranks is nearly the same as a 5’10″ person using 177.5mm cranks. Your knees will move no more than theirs in proportion to your hips, etc. It’s simply an attempt at matching the overall geometry of your ride to your height.

    I say, try them out (the potential benefit is worth the $50 investment) and see for yourself. Don’t take someone else’s word for it who may simply be unfamiliar with the concept.

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Thanks for the comments.

    While I agree that longer cranks are not going to be universally applicable, I think that — for unknown reasons, perhaps fear of the unknown (for them) — there are a lot of detractors. However, remember that longer cranks are simply proportionally correct. A tall person like yourself using 195mm cranks is nearly the same as a 5’10″ person using 177.5mm cranks. Your knees will move no more than theirs in proportion to your hips, etc. It’s simply an attempt at matching the overall geometry of your ride to your height.

    I say, try them out (the potential benefit is worth the $50 investment) and see for yourself. Don’t take someone else’s word for it who may simply be unfamiliar with the concept.

  • Targo said,

    Like I mentioned my coach is very tall and does have experience with then.

    and I don’t have the available stach height to lower my stem to match a new lower seat position.

    If you want to lend me $4500 for a new custom frame built around 200mm cranks I’ll be happy to try them. ;-)

  • Targo said,

    Like I mentioned my coach is very tall and does have experience with then.

    and I don’t have the available stach height to lower my stem to match a new lower seat position.

    If you want to lend me $4500 for a new custom frame built around 200mm cranks I’ll be happy to try them. ;-)

  • Targo said,

    StacK

  • Targo said,

    StacK

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Why not just make one out of wood? http://www.toolcrib.com/blog/2009/03/14/10-free-wooden-bike-plans-make-your-own-wood-recumbent-bamboo-bike-and-more/

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Why not just make one out of wood? http://www.toolcrib.com/blog/2009/03/14/10-free-wooden-bike-plans-make-your-own-wood-recumbent-bamboo-bike-and-more/

  • guised said,

    Hi SuperClydesdale,
    I’m a UK 6’7″ fan of your blog site. Can you give a further update on how the cranks are performing for you and whether any negatives have exposed themself. I’m currently on 185mm which were hard enough to source but really appreciate them over 170 (standard). With a 37″ inside leg I’m extremely tempted by Zinns integrated cranks in 195mm length. Especially after your findings so far.

    Keep up the excellent posts,
    Thanks
    Dan

  • guised said,

    Hi SuperClydesdale,
    I’m a UK 6’7″ fan of your blog site. Can you give a further update on how the cranks are performing for you and whether any negatives have exposed themself. I’m currently on 185mm which were hard enough to source but really appreciate them over 170 (standard). With a 37″ inside leg I’m extremely tempted by Zinns integrated cranks in 195mm length. Especially after your findings so far.

    Keep up the excellent posts,
    Thanks
    Dan

  • Fr8train said,

    SuperClydesdale – just found out about your site; glad you’re carrying the flag for us big guys. I’m 6’6″ and right now about 280lbs, and have been riding 190′s for about five years (first HSC 190 machined for a square-taper BB, and now Lennard Zinn 190 with the integrated BB), and am very pleased with the results.

    For another perspective on crank length, check out Kirby Palm’s webpage: http://www.nettally.com/palmk/crankset.html

    He’s a character, but I think his calculations are spot-on. Reading his analysis finally caused me to order my first set of 190s, and I’m glad to have made the switch.

    Just starting to look around at your blog – very good stuff!

    John

  • Fr8train said,

    SuperClydesdale – just found out about your site; glad you’re carrying the flag for us big guys. I’m 6’6″ and right now about 280lbs, and have been riding 190′s for about five years (first HSC 190 machined for a square-taper BB, and now Lennard Zinn 190 with the integrated BB), and am very pleased with the results.

    For another perspective on crank length, check out Kirby Palm’s webpage: http://www.nettally.com/palmk/crankset.html

    He’s a character, but I think his calculations are spot-on. Reading his analysis finally caused me to order my first set of 190s, and I’m glad to have made the switch.

    Just starting to look around at your blog – very good stuff!

    John

  • Merry New Year » Super Clydesdale said,

    [...] Discovered the benefits of longer cranks for my road bike, adopting a 195mm crankset, which made a huge difference to my road [...]

  • Merry New Year » Super Clydesdale said,

    [...] Discovered the benefits of longer cranks for my road bike, adopting a 195mm crankset, which made a huge difference to my road [...]

  • kporter said,

    Great site glad I found it!

    Been riding 205mm cranks from Zinn his season. I have no scientific data to report but can tell you I am riding signficantly better despite being no better prepared this season than last.

    I am not all that tall (6’2″) but went to Lennard’s shop and he measured me up. My legs are disproportionately long. I am thinking about a custom bike from Zinn given the tighter geometry and BB higher off the ground.

    Just seems logical hat given the same gear a longer lever would result in greater leverage and therefore improved efficiency.

  • kporter said,

    Great site glad I found it!

    Been riding 205mm cranks from Zinn his season. I have no scientific data to report but can tell you I am riding signficantly better despite being no better prepared this season than last.

    I am not all that tall (6’2″) but went to Lennard’s shop and he measured me up. My legs are disproportionately long. I am thinking about a custom bike from Zinn given the tighter geometry and BB higher off the ground.

    Just seems logical hat given the same gear a longer lever would result in greater leverage and therefore improved efficiency.

  • Clydesdale not Fat Pony said,

    I’m 6’6″ with a 98cm cycling inseam. I use the High Sierra/Zinn square taper crank in a 205mm triple. I can’t believe what an absolute difference these make. It is like night and day. I used to hate the 175mm clown cranks on my bikes compared to my 180mm cranks. I felt miserable on rides on any bike with the 175mm cranks (especially the tandem). I was so impressed with these cranks I picked up some 200mm for the tandem. They are strong enough to support me: 350lbs. I went with a Phil Wood BB installed by Zinn.

  • Clydesdale not Fat Pony said,

    I’m 6’6″ with a 98cm cycling inseam. I use the High Sierra/Zinn square taper crank in a 205mm triple. I can’t believe what an absolute difference these make. It is like night and day. I used to hate the 175mm clown cranks on my bikes compared to my 180mm cranks. I felt miserable on rides on any bike with the 175mm cranks (especially the tandem). I was so impressed with these cranks I picked up some 200mm for the tandem. They are strong enough to support me: 350lbs. I went with a Phil Wood BB installed by Zinn.

  • Duck said,

    Super Clyde,

    I was curious if you had any problems either bottoming out or having your foot strike your front tire while turning.

    The staff at me favorite bicycle shop here in DC love to theorize on what a freak like me should do and all the many problems I may run into.

    I always take it pretty easy on turns rarely ever pedaling through the sharp ones. However I wear size 50 shoes. Have you ever heard of someone having there foot strike their tire? I would Imagine that would suck in a pretty epic way.

    I know eventually I may need to get a Zinn frame but would putting 200mm – 210mm cranks on my 64cm Motobecane be asking for trouble?

  • Duck said,

    Super Clyde,

    I was curious if you had any problems either bottoming out or having your foot strike your front tire while turning.

    The staff at me favorite bicycle shop here in DC love to theorize on what a freak like me should do and all the many problems I may run into.

    I always take it pretty easy on turns rarely ever pedaling through the sharp ones. However I wear size 50 shoes. Have you ever heard of someone having there foot strike their tire? I would Imagine that would suck in a pretty epic way.

    I know eventually I may need to get a Zinn frame but would putting 200mm – 210mm cranks on my 64cm Motobecane be asking for trouble?

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Duck, I do have my feet hit the tires on very tight turns, but they do that even on my 180′s. Also, on tight turns, you have to coast through them. It’s well worth the trade-off, as unless you’re racing, you really don’t need to pedal through tight turns — it’s an incredible small percentage of your ride time. You will also have the possibility of your heels striking the chain stays. Mine clear by a hair. I could remedy this by ordering cranks with a great Q factor (http://sheldonbrown.com/cranks.html#tread). Us bigger guys probably need slightly wider cranks anyway because our hips are wider. To go with significantly longer cranks (above 195), I’d recommend a frame with a higher crank set — like the Zinn you refer to. Also, a wider wheel based to minimize your toe strikes to the front tire.

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Duck, I do have my feet hit the tires on very tight turns, but they do that even on my 180′s. Also, on tight turns, you have to coast through them. It’s well worth the trade-off, as unless you’re racing, you really don’t need to pedal through tight turns — it’s an incredible small percentage of your ride time. You will also have the possibility of your heels striking the chain stays. Mine clear by a hair. I could remedy this by ordering cranks with a great Q factor (http://sheldonbrown.com/cranks.html#tread). Us bigger guys probably need slightly wider cranks anyway because our hips are wider. To go with significantly longer cranks (above 195), I’d recommend a frame with a higher crank set — like the Zinn you refer to. Also, a wider wheel based to minimize your toe strikes to the front tire.

  • Duck said,

    Thank you for taking the time out to answer. Exactly the information I needed. I can’t wait to see the the difference there will be when I finally get to use this leverage of mine.

    Extremely helpful, well written and entertaining blog. I’m a big fan. If only there was more representation for us big guys in other areas…

  • Duck said,

    Thank you for taking the time out to answer. Exactly the information I needed. I can’t wait to see the the difference there will be when I finally get to use this leverage of mine.

    Extremely helpful, well written and entertaining blog. I’m a big fan. If only there was more representation for us big guys in other areas…

  • kingdavid said,

    Firstly, I’m glad I found your site. Secondly, I wish I had followed my intuition and spent the money to get long cranks many years ago. Im on 180′s and need more!
    Here’s my story (get your tissues ready):
    I’ve always loved cycling but it wasn’t until I was 25 years old that I got into bike racing. I started out with 172.5mm cranks and then jumped to 180mma year later. What a difference!
    I used to train with a group of experienced racers who would usually leave me behind on the big climbs. The first day I put on the 180′s, I expected the same to happen. When no-one was passing me I wondered why they were taking it so easy. Well, they couldn’t, begorrah! I was amazed as were they to how everything had changed. The tables had turned and all day for the 120km, I pulled and pulled all day on the front like a madman possessed. One was even mad because I wouldn’t give up on the front.
    And at the end of the day, attacked and left all but two behind, and they only just caught me after 10km.
    I went from being mediocre to near the top just like that – with a change of the cranks. And people spending money on carbon stems with no results!
    And here’s the cracker – My leg length or true inseam is 97cm (38″) so according to Zinn and Kirby Palm, I could be turning 205mm to 210mm. Yikes.
    With the 180mm, at the time when I lived in Montreal, I made pretty much every breakaway in my 3rd season and made the selection for the Quebec team, and ended up being the only guy to make it to the last stage of the 6 day race.
    There was another guy my height in the team and who I also trained with but he just didn’t believe longer cranks would make such a difference. He quipped that I was doping! And like many the non-believer, he shunned the idea or even trying bigger cranks. “What if I’ve been wrong my whole life?” For some, that notion is all too much to bear.
    I have to say, having read this article and others and done more research, on top of my own mathematical and engineering background combined with the practicalities or experience or racing and training, I feel quite certain I would benefit significantly from the longer cranks.
    Like a maddened new king, I’m salivating at the potential I may reap from when I finally sit aboard a newly long cranked chariot of lunacy.
    At 83kg (183lbs), a weight I can neither increase or decrease, I used to think, oh, I’m just a bit too heavy for the big climbs. But I think I should be excelling in the climbs in the future. When you consider the jump from 180 to 205 or 210′s, crudely measured, it’s about a 15% increase in power potential. Perhaps similar to me droppingg from 83kg to 72kg! Ok, these measurements are crude and ideal, but the proof will be in the pudding.
    Thanks for posting this.
    I would love to try the difference in a Zinn custom built bike, but for now I ride anything with about a 600mm toptube. I have found that if getting a carbon, bike, it has to be a very good one and a very stiff one. I cracked a supposedly good one (expensive) a few years ago by just twisting the bars.
    As a side-note, I have tried a 29er mountain bike and yes, definitely, for taller riders, go for it.

  • kingdavid said,

    Firstly, I’m glad I found your site. Secondly, I wish I had followed my intuition and spent the money to get long cranks many years ago. Im on 180′s and need more!
    Here’s my story (get your tissues ready):
    I’ve always loved cycling but it wasn’t until I was 25 years old that I got into bike racing. I started out with 172.5mm cranks and then jumped to 180mma year later. What a difference!
    I used to train with a group of experienced racers who would usually leave me behind on the big climbs. The first day I put on the 180′s, I expected the same to happen. When no-one was passing me I wondered why they were taking it so easy. Well, they couldn’t, begorrah! I was amazed as were they to how everything had changed. The tables had turned and all day for the 120km, I pulled and pulled all day on the front like a madman possessed. One was even mad because I wouldn’t give up on the front.
    And at the end of the day, attacked and left all but two behind, and they only just caught me after 10km.
    I went from being mediocre to near the top just like that – with a change of the cranks. And people spending money on carbon stems with no results!
    And here’s the cracker – My leg length or true inseam is 97cm (38″) so according to Zinn and Kirby Palm, I could be turning 205mm to 210mm. Yikes.
    With the 180mm, at the time when I lived in Montreal, I made pretty much every breakaway in my 3rd season and made the selection for the Quebec team, and ended up being the only guy to make it to the last stage of the 6 day race.
    There was another guy my height in the team and who I also trained with but he just didn’t believe longer cranks would make such a difference. He quipped that I was doping! And like many the non-believer, he shunned the idea or even trying bigger cranks. “What if I’ve been wrong my whole life?” For some, that notion is all too much to bear.
    I have to say, having read this article and others and done more research, on top of my own mathematical and engineering background combined with the practicalities or experience or racing and training, I feel quite certain I would benefit significantly from the longer cranks.
    Like a maddened new king, I’m salivating at the potential I may reap from when I finally sit aboard a newly long cranked chariot of lunacy.
    At 83kg (183lbs), a weight I can neither increase or decrease, I used to think, oh, I’m just a bit too heavy for the big climbs. But I think I should be excelling in the climbs in the future. When you consider the jump from 180 to 205 or 210′s, crudely measured, it’s about a 15% increase in power potential. Perhaps similar to me droppingg from 83kg to 72kg! Ok, these measurements are crude and ideal, but the proof will be in the pudding.
    Thanks for posting this.
    I would love to try the difference in a Zinn custom built bike, but for now I ride anything with about a 600mm toptube. I have found that if getting a carbon, bike, it has to be a very good one and a very stiff one. I cracked a supposedly good one (expensive) a few years ago by just twisting the bars.
    As a side-note, I have tried a 29er mountain bike and yes, definitely, for taller riders, go for it.

  • BJ211 said,

    I am 6’8″ and have been riding a 64cm TREK w/175 FSA cranks
    I just scored a set of 180mm SRAM apex and can’t wait to try them. Now i did get a bike fit after two century rides jacked my knees pretty bad. so hoping i don’t have to re-fit for such a small difference. I do know how that small diff can be huge on a climb. I run 180mm on my Mt bike and it was a nice change. Would like the same for my road bike oh and i am a 36″ inseam. So i’ll get back with the new feel.

  • BJ211 said,

    I am 6’8″ and have been riding a 64cm TREK w/175 FSA cranks
    I just scored a set of 180mm SRAM apex and can’t wait to try them. Now i did get a bike fit after two century rides jacked my knees pretty bad. so hoping i don’t have to re-fit for such a small difference. I do know how that small diff can be huge on a climb. I run 180mm on my Mt bike and it was a nice change. Would like the same for my road bike oh and i am a 36″ inseam. So i’ll get back with the new feel.

  • kingdavid said,

    Ha, I’m surprised there has only been one comment since my last input. I can tell you I have my heart set on the phenomenal new KHS FLITE 747 designed by Lennard Zinn. It comes a 200mm compact crankset (34/50) and 10 speed Shimano and 46cm wide bars. If you bought the same bike direct from Zinn, it would cost more than double than the deal he has worked with Zinn.
    It has a 620mm toptube and frame material is trusty Reynolds 520. Sounds like a life long love affair.
    From my research into this bike, what you would really want to upgrade firstly would be the Tektro brakes which are pretty crap and also apparently the seat post is too short which I would swap for a 400mm alloy post (not carbon!)
    Like me if you’re tall and skinny and not big and bulky, I’d probably also change to 44cm bars but I’ll see how I go. The comparably heavier and bigger frame may feel better during standing climb with the wider leverage of the 46cm bars.
    Also, I really don’t need the ultra strong (and I’m sure heavy) 36 spoke heavy duty Weinmann wheels. A lighter set would make the bike quiet a different creature. I’m only 83kg. 6’4″ (194cm) with 38″ (97cm) true inseam.
    I’m going to buy this bike when I go to the US in a month or two) (you can also order it through the KHS sales rep in the UK at: steve@khsbikes.co.uk.
    I’m also a fan of the calculation for cranklengths of multiplying your inseam by .21 for very long legs or .216 for average leg lengths.
    My main reasons for choosing this bike are:
    1. It has 200mm cranks which my leg length can easily handle. This will make me a lot faster. My jump from 175mm to 180mm made me so much faster: read my post above.
    2. The frame is designed to accommodate the long cranks as the BB is 25 to 30mm higher than most road bike frames. I’m not aware of any other frame with this design feature of a high BB.
    3. It’s a bargain at only around 1520 GBP or even cheaper in the States.
    4. The frame design looks very smart. Big frames can suffer from flex, wobble, twist, sway. The ‘compact design should reduce these issues and the Reynolds 520 steel is an excellent material, even if it’s heavier. I’m sure I’ll be a lot faster on this than I would be on my present lightweight bike with 180mm cranks, particularly when I fit it with lighter wheels.
    5. It’s designed by Lennard Zinn! I’ve combed carefully over all the design details and the geometry and it looks very well sorted out.
    6. There is nothing else like it on the market.
    7. No, 200mm cranks are not ridiculously long if the legs turning them are in proportion to them.
    8. It looks beautiful baby!
    I cannot wait to ride it up the mountains.
    Looking forward to your feedback and I’ll try to remember to post my feedback after I’ve had the bike for a few weeks:)

  • kingdavid said,

    Ha, I’m surprised there has only been one comment since my last input. I can tell you I have my heart set on the phenomenal new KHS FLITE 747 designed by Lennard Zinn. It comes a 200mm compact crankset (34/50) and 10 speed Shimano and 46cm wide bars. If you bought the same bike direct from Zinn, it would cost more than double than the deal he has worked with Zinn.
    It has a 620mm toptube and frame material is trusty Reynolds 520. Sounds like a life long love affair.
    From my research into this bike, what you would really want to upgrade firstly would be the Tektro brakes which are pretty crap and also apparently the seat post is too short which I would swap for a 400mm alloy post (not carbon!)
    Like me if you’re tall and skinny and not big and bulky, I’d probably also change to 44cm bars but I’ll see how I go. The comparably heavier and bigger frame may feel better during standing climb with the wider leverage of the 46cm bars.
    Also, I really don’t need the ultra strong (and I’m sure heavy) 36 spoke heavy duty Weinmann wheels. A lighter set would make the bike quiet a different creature. I’m only 83kg. 6’4″ (194cm) with 38″ (97cm) true inseam.
    I’m going to buy this bike when I go to the US in a month or two) (you can also order it through the KHS sales rep in the UK at: steve@khsbikes.co.uk.
    I’m also a fan of the calculation for cranklengths of multiplying your inseam by .21 for very long legs or .216 for average leg lengths.
    My main reasons for choosing this bike are:
    1. It has 200mm cranks which my leg length can easily handle. This will make me a lot faster. My jump from 175mm to 180mm made me so much faster: read my post above.
    2. The frame is designed to accommodate the long cranks as the BB is 25 to 30mm higher than most road bike frames. I’m not aware of any other frame with this design feature of a high BB.
    3. It’s a bargain at only around 1520 GBP or even cheaper in the States.
    4. The frame design looks very smart. Big frames can suffer from flex, wobble, twist, sway. The ‘compact design should reduce these issues and the Reynolds 520 steel is an excellent material, even if it’s heavier. I’m sure I’ll be a lot faster on this than I would be on my present lightweight bike with 180mm cranks, particularly when I fit it with lighter wheels.
    5. It’s designed by Lennard Zinn! I’ve combed carefully over all the design details and the geometry and it looks very well sorted out.
    6. There is nothing else like it on the market.
    7. No, 200mm cranks are not ridiculously long if the legs turning them are in proportion to them.
    8. It looks beautiful baby!
    I cannot wait to ride it up the mountains.
    Looking forward to your feedback and I’ll try to remember to post my feedback after I’ve had the bike for a few weeks:)

  • andypandy said,

    I ride the KHS 747. 200mm cranks seem perfect with 37″ inseam. Did feel the need for other wheels, brakes and fork, but a bike that fits! That is awesome.

  • andypandy said,

    I ride the KHS 747. 200mm cranks seem perfect with 37″ inseam. Did feel the need for other wheels, brakes and fork, but a bike that fits! That is awesome.

  • brendan montgomerie said,

    I have posted under this topic elsewhere on this site,
    but I just can’t advocate for proportionate
    length cranks enough! One way or the other,
    little guys have been holding us back by
    obviously not trying to cater to us. It took a tall
    guy in the industry, LZ, to liberate us from this bias.
    Miguel Indurain was my cycling hero and inspiration for
    going out and racing. But he did’t do us any favors
    by not sharing the fantastic results he was getting was not just the
    product of his superior genetics and training,
    but also the added leverage he gained from his secret
    190 mm crankset! He waited until after he retired to make
    that “admission”!
    If you are riding proportionate cranks and acclimate
    to them, it is highly unlikely you will ever go back.
    I had to sub some 175′s for a few days while
    I waited for a set of bearings for my LZ JIS
    200 mm’s. It was a bad experience. I felt cramped.
    In the way I always feel on airplanes, like my knees
    can’t get enough blood circulation. I also noticed
    I had to work much harder to maintain power
    that was previously automatic.
    Previous commenter- I think Kirby Palmer is dead,
    but his body of work is excellent and it will continue
    to be one of my most valuable reference tools.
    Summing up, I really, really want all the long legged
    cyclists to get on board proportionate crank length
    bikes and administer some smack down!
    The more of us who distinguish ourselves in
    bike racing, the more the cycling industry will
    cater to us. I need longer stems, cranks and frames.
    And longer jerseys, more shoes in my size, armwarmers
    legwarmers, and what the hell, maybe taller
    wheels. Most of that is available, but not in the
    huge variety it is for mr./mr.s 56cm size 40 30inch
    inseam etc.
    I have tried every formula and I favor the
    femoral length in inchs converted to MM’s.
    Seems to me the lower leg is just there to transfer
    the power of the upper leg, which is the “lever”,
    over to the other “lever”,the crank, hence total inseam
    is probably not as accurate as that includes the length
    of the lower leg, whose proportions should not effect
    leverage.
    Blah de blah… Get the cranks, build the rest of your bike around
    them. If you have clearance issues, get the lowest
    Q-factor crankset available, get speedplay or bebop pedals,
    then if you still have clearance issues get a zinn frame.
    But don’t get shorter cranks. I hope this and all the other comments
    contribute to long legged people going faster.

  • brendan montgomerie said,

    I have posted under this topic elsewhere on this site,
    but I just can’t advocate for proportionate
    length cranks enough! One way or the other,
    little guys have been holding us back by
    obviously not trying to cater to us. It took a tall
    guy in the industry, LZ, to liberate us from this bias.
    Miguel Indurain was my cycling hero and inspiration for
    going out and racing. But he did’t do us any favors
    by not sharing the fantastic results he was getting was not just the
    product of his superior genetics and training,
    but also the added leverage he gained from his secret
    190 mm crankset! He waited until after he retired to make
    that “admission”!
    If you are riding proportionate cranks and acclimate
    to them, it is highly unlikely you will ever go back.
    I had to sub some 175′s for a few days while
    I waited for a set of bearings for my LZ JIS
    200 mm’s. It was a bad experience. I felt cramped.
    In the way I always feel on airplanes, like my knees
    can’t get enough blood circulation. I also noticed
    I had to work much harder to maintain power
    that was previously automatic.
    Previous commenter- I think Kirby Palmer is dead,
    but his body of work is excellent and it will continue
    to be one of my most valuable reference tools.
    Summing up, I really, really want all the long legged
    cyclists to get on board proportionate crank length
    bikes and administer some smack down!
    The more of us who distinguish ourselves in
    bike racing, the more the cycling industry will
    cater to us. I need longer stems, cranks and frames.
    And longer jerseys, more shoes in my size, armwarmers
    legwarmers, and what the hell, maybe taller
    wheels. Most of that is available, but not in the
    huge variety it is for mr./mr.s 56cm size 40 30inch
    inseam etc.
    I have tried every formula and I favor the
    femoral length in inchs converted to MM’s.
    Seems to me the lower leg is just there to transfer
    the power of the upper leg, which is the “lever”,
    over to the other “lever”,the crank, hence total inseam
    is probably not as accurate as that includes the length
    of the lower leg, whose proportions should not effect
    leverage.
    Blah de blah… Get the cranks, build the rest of your bike around
    them. If you have clearance issues, get the lowest
    Q-factor crankset available, get speedplay or bebop pedals,
    then if you still have clearance issues get a zinn frame.
    But don’t get shorter cranks. I hope this and all the other comments
    contribute to long legged people going faster.

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