DT Swiss wheels for heavy riders

Posted by SuperClydesdale on October 3, 2010 under Wheels | 4 Comments to Read

DT Swiss has a great name in wheels, particularly in the quality of their hubs.  Some manufacturers put their rims on DT Swiss hubs to complete their wheelsets (such as ENVE).

DT Swiss wheels mostly cover only smaller big men, with 220 pound weight limits.  The RR 1850 and the R 1900 both can go up to 242 pounds.

One major problem with DT Swiss is that since they are Swiss, the information on their products is unintelligible.  Even the people at the DT Swiss booth – the “wheel experts” – couldn’t tell me accurate information about their products.   For example, the guy at the booth said that only the RR 1850 is Clydesdale-appropriate, and has no weight limit.  In fact, the DT Swiss Technical Data Sheet specifically says that the RR 1850 has a 242 pound rider weight limit (as does the R 1700 Tricon), while the R 1500, R1700, R 1800, and R 1900 all have a 220-pound rider weight limit.

Try to figure out more… good luck.  The guys at the booth didn’t know, and the web site is nonsensical.   So, despite limited cooperation and knowledge from “Team DT Swiss,” the RR1850 did look like a great option for Clydesdales, so I’ve included it in the “short list” recommendation for Clydesdales.

The DT Swiss RR 1850 wheelset. These are rated to 242 pounds, and weigh 1,842 grams for the pair. At 30mm, not terribly aero, and not the lightest aluminum wheelset out there. For $1,000, there may be better options.

So, since the only wheelset that I could get comprehensive information on, or a recommendation from the staff at the DT Swiss booth at Interbike was the RR 1850, that is the only DT Swiss wheelset listed in the summary.

Crash replacement

No crash replacement program is offered by DT Swiss.

Cassette compatibility

Campy and Shimano are explicitly listed.

More information:  www.dtswiss.com

  • kami-the-trout said,

    I appreciate your efforts in compiling this list of wheelsets, but just wondering if you’ve ever looked at some of the less expensive options, like from from ROL and Neuvation?

    I have the Neuvation M28X Aero wheelset, which I got direct from company for $240, delivery included! They are rated 240+ (I’m 230, 6’3″ and love pounding hills) and they’ve been great so far. Rock solid and true, 1750g. A great all-around dau-to-day set, IMHO.

    I’d be curious to know more about the ROL Race SLRs. They have a 1500g set, I think, that’s rated for big guys.

  • kami-the-trout said,

    I appreciate your efforts in compiling this list of wheelsets, but just wondering if you’ve ever looked at some of the less expensive options, like from from ROL and Neuvation?

    I have the Neuvation M28X Aero wheelset, which I got direct from company for $240, delivery included! They are rated 240+ (I’m 230, 6’3″ and love pounding hills) and they’ve been great so far. Rock solid and true, 1750g. A great all-around dau-to-day set, IMHO.

    I’d be curious to know more about the ROL Race SLRs. They have a 1500g set, I think, that’s rated for big guys.

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Yes! This report was focused on “performance wheels” which is a euphemism for ridiculously expensive. For training, I think that it’s a bit opulent to use $1000+ wheels unless your training rides are an ongoing series of hammerfests with your riding buddies. Then, cost is no object — you have to beat them.

    I will be providing more data on less expensive training wheels soon…

  • SuperClydesdale said,

    Yes! This report was focused on “performance wheels” which is a euphemism for ridiculously expensive. For training, I think that it’s a bit opulent to use $1000+ wheels unless your training rides are an ongoing series of hammerfests with your riding buddies. Then, cost is no object — you have to beat them.

    I will be providing more data on less expensive training wheels soon…

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